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Laptop

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by biferi, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. biferi

    biferi Private E-2

    I have a 4 Year old Desktop Computer and it runs Win7 64 Bit and has 4 GB or DDR3 RAM in it.

    I Love Love Love Win7 but I want to get a Laptop that I can just use with my 32 inch screen.

    The Laptops today can do just the same things if not more then the Desktops can.
    This is why I thought I can just use a good Laptop with my 32 inch screen.
    And my Printer is Wi Fi and my SATA 2. Hard Drive are in a Bay that is USB 3.0 and my 32 inch screen is HDMi.

    So is there any Laptops I sould stay away from?
     
  2. DavidGP

    DavidGP MajorGeeks Forum Administrator - Grand Pooh-Bah Staff Member

    Hi

    Not really as most are very good these days from the likes of DELL, HP, ACER, LENOVO etc but with a new laptop these days you will find it comes with Windows 10 and here in lies a few issues, if you love Windows 7 (I do too) and you wish to downgrade W10 to W7 you may find issues in hardware drivers for W10 hardware. However W10 will run fine and will be ok if you use HDMI port to your large monitor, I do same with my Surface tablet to my LED TV when wish to have a larger screen or watch a film.

    How much do you have to spend?
    What do you use your laptop for?
    What laptop makes have you had in the past that you like?

    Personally core hardware I would go for is at least Intel i5 CPU, 8GB RAM, 1TB HDD or 500GB SSD (as can use external HDD for data) and dedicated ATi or Nvidia GPU.
     
  3. plodr

    plodr Major Geek Super Extraordinaire

    I looked at some customer satisfaction ratings a week or so ago. At the bottom of the heap was Toshiba so I'd probably tell you to avoid Toshiba. (I've never owned a Toshiba). I have owned brands that people mentioned to avoid: Packard Bell, HP, Dell and Acer.
    I had problems with one HP desktop computer. It refused to keep the proper time even with a new CMOS battery installed at an HP Service Center. I took the computer back to the place of purchase and said I didn't want it because something was wrong with it. I got a replacement and that desktop ran fine for years.
     
  4. Digerati

    Digerati MajorGeek

    Not really. The only "more" aspect is they are mobile. But notebook makers, to a point, can pack the power of a PC into those tiny notebook cases, but they cannot pack in the essential cooling. So even full tower PC cases are challenged to keep heavily tasked PC computers properly cooled. This causes notebook CPUs to frequently throttle back in speed (and performance) to prevent overheating.

    Notebook cases are not designed to be opened for thorough cleaning either by "normal" users either. This means over time, heat trapping dust will build up inside. Whereas a PC case is designed to easily remove the whole side to expose the full interior for a proper cleaning.

    Notebooks don't have an ATX Form Factor Standard dictating shapes and sizes of the major components, or the connectors and voltages they need. This ATX standard allows consumers to buy a Gigabyte motherboard, MSI graphics card, EVGA power supply, and put them in an Antec case and know they will work just fine together. And then next year, we can upgrade every part from different manufacturers. Notebooks are very proprietary and upgrades, if possible at all, are very limited and almost exclusively must come from the notebook maker.

    So while marketing weenies want us to believe notebooks make great gaming or "desktop replacement" computers, the very nature of their compact and proprietary designed prevent that. If you don't need portability, I highly recommend a PC instead.

    I don't know what to say about Toshiba. I have heard of the problems, but my 7 year old Toshiba is still running strong. I've had no problems with it at all. I'm still using the original battery too. The battery run time is not as long as it was when new, but that is normal.

    Lenovo makes good notebooks, but I would avoid Lenovo at all costs. It is not about quality - it is about principle and security. Lenovo has a long history (since buying out IBM's PC business in 2005) of shipping computers with malware and spying on customers. The "Superfish" scandal in February 2015 is a huge example. And they admitted it! But note they said they stopped that specific practice not because it presented a security risk to its customers, but due to some browser pop-up behavior! And, despite their claims to stop these malicious activities entirely, they keep at it! August 2015, The Guardian, Lenovo does it again. I have many more examples, but the point is made.

    Even IF Lenovo management and executives are not active participants in all these repeat malicious activities, the fact it keeps happening over and over again (and with new code too) is a clear indication they are not doing much, if anything, to prevent it from happening again and again! Whether it is because they are lining their greedy pockets, or it is through intimidation and coercion by the corrupt and hostile Chinese government, or both, Lenovo computers cannot be "trusted".
     
  5. plodr

    plodr Major Geek Super Extraordinaire

    So you've had the same experience as me. People say "avoid brand name " and yet you and I have had no problem with so-called troublesome brands.

    Of course I refuse to tweak until I break something. I read what other people do and I know that they just create problems because of constantly removing things/cleaning etc.

    You can usually tell in the first week if something is wrong. I forgot, I took an eMachine back to Walmart after a few days because it would no longer turn on. I requested my credit card be credited back with the purchase price. I thought about this for 2 weeks then went back and bought the same model. This was in Oct. 2009 and I'm currently using the computer to post this message.

    If something seems wrong, I take it back and complain. I don't fix hardware problems unless the computer is at least a year old.
     
  6. biferi

    biferi Private E-2

    OK here it goes.

    I did Build a PC before so I have a Win 7 64 Bit CD with Activation code from Microsoft.

    I thought I would just get a Laptop without any OS on it and install my win7.
    What I want to do is get a Laptop and set it to Never Turn Off When Lid Is Closed.

    And have it Plug into my 32 TV Screen with an HDMi Cable.

    And my Keyboard and Mouse are both USB.

    And my SATA2. Hard Drive Bay under my Desk is USB 30. and my Printer is Wi Fi.

    What do you think?
     
  7. Digerati

    Digerati MajorGeek

    I think it silly to avoid entire brands based on the performance of specific models within that brand when the company makes dozens, if not 100s of different products. It is highly unlikely every product the company makes are lemons.

    Corsair power supplies are a good example. In recent years, the quality of their entry-level supplies has declined as they switched to different OEM suppliers and [apparently] decreased quality assurance and standards. So I avoid and do not recommend them. Their top-of-the-line models, however, are some of the best in the industry and highly recommended.

    I will avoid/boycott entire brands, when possible, if company policies or business practices warrant it, however. Lenovo's repeating pattern of malicious behavior, for example. A company with consistently rude and/or unhelpful customer service is likely to cause me to shop elsewhere, even if I have to pay higher prices.
    This is especially true with electronics which tend to either fail within the first few hours of use, or they last for many years. There are exceptions, of course, but that's the general rule. This is exactly why all computers used to go through a "burn-in" period before leaving the factory. But even that costly practice stopped because the quality of raw materials and manufacturing techniques improved so much that the vast majority of products coming off assembly lines are reliable and do last many years. In fact, most electronics is retired and replaced due to obsolescence, not premature failure.
    Which coincides with most warranty periods anyway. Users trying to fix something under warranty is often a valid reason companies void or refuse to honor warranties.
     
  8. Digerati

    Digerati MajorGeek

    You have to check your W7 EULA. If that copy of W7 is an OEM/System Builder license (as the vast majority are), that license is inextricably tied to the "O"riginal "E"quipment - that is, the original computer it came with or was installed on. Those licenses cannot legally be transferred to any new computer under any circumstances. Only full "retail" licenses are transferable. And we agree to those terms of the EULA when we decide to keep using that license on the old machine. And that makes it legally binding.

    Do note that notebooks are designed to at least go into sleep mode when the lid is closed in part because closing the lid will trap some of the heat and restrict cooling.

    Note if your desire to stick with W7 is because you don't like the UI or Windows 10 desktop, there are simple and inexpensive ways around that. I use Start10 to bring back the familiar W7 start menu and desktop. It costs a whole $5. There is also ClassicShell and it is free. W7 is already pushing 8 years old and mainstream support for W7 already ended 2 years ago!
     
  9. FreddieC

    FreddieC Private E-2

    I'm an HP guy. I have been using HP laptops for more than fifteen years and they have never given me any real problems.
     
  10. plodr

    plodr Major Geek Super Extraordinaire

  11. Digerati

    Digerati MajorGeek

  12. AlexSurf86

    AlexSurf86 Private E-2

  13. mdonah

    mdonah Major Geek Extraordinaire

    The Dell Inspiron has what DavidGP mentions plus two additional coolers. But, the OP wants Windows 7 on the laptop and the Dell Inspiron comes with Windows 10.

    He could get a refurbished or used laptop with no OS but, would need to check for HDMI output.
     
  14. mdonah

    mdonah Major Geek Extraordinaire

    Is this a Retail DVD?

    Most modern laptops have HDMI output.

    You won't need the keyboard since the laptop will have one and some functions will require the use of the Fn key on the laptop's keyboard (like switching to the external TV/monitor).

    Most modern laptops have USB 3.0 connectivity and wi-fi.
     
  15. Just Playin

    Just Playin MajorGeek

    I don't think you're necessarily looking for a laptop, but that you want something small.
     
  16. plodr

    plodr Major Geek Super Extraordinaire

    The OP stopped viewing this thread 3 months ago. Why was it dragged up?
     
    Digerati likes this.

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