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  #1  
Old 08-05-12, 15:19
kerik kerik is offline
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Post new build-need advice plz

hows this for a rig
CORSAIR Professional Series HX850 (CMPSU-850HX) 850W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

GIGABYTE GV-R797TO-3GD Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card-x2

Thermaltake Element V Black Edition Steel Full Tower Computer Case Colorshift Fans VL200K1W2Z

Pioneer Black 12X BD-R 2X BD-RE 16X DVD+R 10X BD-ROM 4MB Cache SATA Internal BD/DVD/CD Writer BDR-207DBKS

OCZ Agility 3 AGT3-25SAT3-240G 2.5" 240GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

CORSAIR H100 (CWCH100) Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler

G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-16GXM

ASUS Sabertooth 990FX AM3+ AMD 990FX SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

AMD FX-8150 Zambezi 3.6GHz Socket AM3+ 125W Eight-Core Desktop Processor FD8150FRGUBOX



any help or advice you could give would really be outstanding and thanks in advance
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  #2  
Old 08-06-12, 04:42
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

Looks like a good set to me. I can't see any obvious compatibility problems but I would recommend boosting the PSU wattage a bit more. Have a look here for a wattage calculator and see what it says:

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

Just remember to stick to a good PSU brand like you are already doing.
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Old 08-06-12, 10:29
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

Quote:
hows this for a rig
Sadly, you told nothing of the intended purpose of this computer. It would make a nice gaming rig, but is not suited for CAD/CAE work. And it is way overkill for simple surfing or as a PVR in a HTPC setup.

I don't see an operating system listed. A common mistake is some users assume they can use their old Windows license on a new computer. Understand only a "boxed" full Retail license can be transferred to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard). It is illegal to use an OEM license that came with or was purchased for one computer on another computer. A disk “branded” with a computer maker’s brand name, or is labeled with “OEM/System Builder”, “Upgrade”, “Academic Edition”, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", is not transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". So if that is the case, I recommend 64-bit Windows 7 or one of the many free Linux alternatives. Just ensure it is 64-bit since you have selected 16Gb of RAM. Note I am just the messenger stating the facts. This is all in the EULAs we agree to abide by when we first use our OEM software.

I personally think that 850W Corsair has plenty horsepower for this setup - even with two graphics cards. I note the minimum recommended, as stated by Gigabyte is 550W. You don't need 300 more for a second card.

I use that eXtreme PSU calc all the time - I like it so much, I bought a lifetime license for the Pro version - highly recommended for frequent builders and enthusiasts - OCers too. But in addition to plugging in the hardware, I introduce a large buffer or overhead to allow for future upgrades and aging.

In this case, I entered that AMD CPU, the 3 drives, 4 140 LED fans, the water cooler and two HD 7970 cards, plus the following,
Motherboard - High-end Desktop
CPU TDP - 100%
System (peak load) - 100%
Capacitor Aging - 10%
With those pretty extreme settings, the minimum needed is 713W and the recommended is 763W - well under your Corsair 850W - a reputable brand, BTW.

It should be noted even when your computer is pushed, it would be very rare for your entire system to run at peak demand at the same time even for a few seconds, let alone an extended period of time. About the only time that ever happens is during PSU benchmarking - clearly not a real-world situation. So to me, it says your 850 is more than enough - unless you plan on adding a 3rd $470 graphics card in the near future!

Note with the motherboard and other settings set to the calculator's defaults, that system needs 555W with a recommended minimum of 605W. That means your 850 will likely be loafing along most of the time - and that means its fan will likely run slower - and more importantly (IMO) quietly.

Quote:
CORSAIR H100 (CWCH100) Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler
While it may not be a concern to you, you need to be aware that both Intel and AMD have the same policy when it comes to the 3-year warranties on their CPUs that come boxed with a supplied cooling solution and the AMD CPU Warranty states it crystal clear:
"This Limited Warranty shall be null and void if the AMD microprocessor which is the subject of this Limited Warranty is used with any heatsink/fan other than the one provided herewith."
Again, if the CPU warranty is not a concern, and for many enthusiasts, it is not, then no problem. But it is something all buyers/builders need to be aware of. Note because OEM coolers are the ONLY coolers that cover replacement of the CPU too in the rare event damage occurs, and because neither AMD nor Intel want to replace your CPU (or the HSF assembly) because of inadequate cooling, the supplied coolers are excellent coolers, more than adequate for the vast majority of users and applications. And again, I am just the messenger.

While I think that TT case is an excellent case with lots of good fan support, I don't like it because it does not have removable, washable air filters - an absolute must for all my builds. I don't like breaking down my systems to lug outside for cleaning out the dust the case fans inevitably suck in too. Besides the risk of ESD, knocking something loose or bending a pin on a connector, it is just too hard on my back. Washable filters drastically reduces the frequency I need to do that.

Also - strictly my opinion here but I am not a fan of fancy lights on a case. I expect my cases to sit quietly, and discreetly off to the side and NOT draw attention to themselves. After all, I want to pay attention to what's on my monitors, not my case. Fancy lights do nothing for performance, use some power and generate some heat, and do nothing for performance - worth repeating.

Lastly, I recommend you go out to Corsair, Gigabyte and ASUS and download the PSU, card and board's manuals now and become familiar with the PSU's cables, and the card's and board's power connection requirements/configurations (also to verify that PSU has all the necessary connections for two cards). Also read up on ESD precautions and become familiar with the motherboard mounting points on the board and case, CPU mounting etc. What else do you have to do while waiting for the delivery truck?
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Old 08-07-12, 03:58
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

It would appear that my assessment of the system's power requirements is off. I apologise for that. I should have looked into it a bit more first.

I would, however, recommend to both of you that the calculator is rerun with capacitor ageing set to 30%. This figure is more representative of the condition your power supply will be in in 4 or 5 years time whilst allowing for more overhead. This probably won't push it over the 850W mark though.
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Old 08-07-12, 07:55
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

Times have changed. I used to (3 or 4 years ago) use 30% aging during all my PSU calculations, but not any more. After all the leaky capacitor problems with motherboards a few years ago, along with the acceptance and demand to go "green" and demand 80 Plus Certifications on our PSUs, capacitor aging in power supplies is no longer the problem it used to be. All the major motherboard makers, graphics card makers and power supply makers started using much higher quality "solid" capacitors. Not "solid-state", but "solid", as opposed to liquid (electrolytic), capacitors. Solid capacitors are much more robust and less affected by aging. Aging will always be a problem inherent with all PSUs, but not nearly as influential as it used to be when poor quality electrolytics were used, resulting in high failure/return rates.

Also, 80 Plus Certification requires meeting or exceeding high-efficiency standards across a wide range of realistic loads. Achieving high-efficiency across a range of expected loads is very difficult and only achievable with a quality design, quality parts and quality assembly (especially soldering) techniques. Better design, better parts, better assembly, AND sufficient sizing (to keep internal heat in check) all relate to reduced aging.

So 10% capacitor aging is more than enough offset when sizing up for a new PSU, if you add in those other variables for headroom too. If you are calculating to see if an old PSU is still good enough, then I agree to bumping up the capacitor aging to 30% to ensure this older PSU is not being strained (creating instability) when put under load.

That said, while buying too small a PSU is sure to cause problems, it does no harm to buy more power than you need, except maybe to your purchasing budget. If your computer needs 400W, it will draw from the PSU 400W, regardless if the PSU is 650W or 1000W. And the PSU will draw from the wall just 400W, plus ~15-20% more that will be wasted due to inefficiency (in the form of heat).
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Old 08-11-12, 10:43
kerik kerik is offline
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

ok so i changed some things around lol. actaually most all of it. mostly gaming, $2000 budget, or as close as possible haha (mine went over) thanks for the info i think this is much better but not sure of the compatibility, again any help ios greatly appreciated.

http://secure.newegg.com/Shopping/Sh...mit=ChangeItem
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Old 08-11-12, 11:07
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

Quote:
Your shopping cart is empty.
Sad what you can get for $2000 these days!
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Old 08-11-12, 11:26
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

sry ill try it this way
Rosewill THOR V2 Gaming ATX Full Tower Computer Case, support up to E-ATX / XL-ATX, come with Four Fans - 1 x Front Red LED ...
Western Digital Caviar Black WD2002FAEX 2TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
ASUS VH242H Black 23.6" 5ms HDMI Full 1080P Widescreen LCD Monitor W/Speakers
EVGA 04G-P4-3687-KR GeForce GTX 680 FTW+ w/Backplate 4GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
CORSAIR HX Series HX750 (CMPSU-750HX) 750W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular ...
G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 14900) Desktop Memory Model F3-14900CL9D-8GBSR
ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge 3.5GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770K
CORSAIR H100 (CWCH100) Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler
LITE-ON Blu-ray Burner with 3D Playback SATA iHBS212-08 LightScribe Support
Kingston HyperX 3K SH103S3/240G 2.5" 240GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) (Stand-Alone Drive)

and arctic silver compound with w7 os
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Old 08-11-12, 12:25
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

Well, my comments about cases apply to this Rosewill too - it does not have removable, washable filters - so for me, that one is out.

My comments about aftermarket coolers and CPU warranties still apply - perhaps not a concern.

Now you mention W7 - just be sure, with 8Gb of RAM, it is 64-bit Windows.
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Old 08-11-12, 13:58
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Default Re: new build-need advice plz

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
That said, while buying too small a PSU is sure to cause problems, it does no harm to buy more power than you need, except maybe to your purchasing budget. If your computer needs 400W, it will draw from the PSU 400W, regardless if the PSU is 650W or 1000W. And the PSU will draw from the wall just 400W, plus ~15-20% more that will be wasted due to inefficiency (in the form of heat).
Good points on the power supplies.

One other important thing to check before buying a PSU is the fine print. Most no-name PSUs (and even some of the well known ones) basically lie about the true output by manipulating the numbers.

Example:

Logisys 480W PSU

+3.3v = 28A (Amps)
+5.0v = 36A
+12v = 16A (roughly 200 watts)
+3.3v & +5v & +12v = 330 watts
Total average output 330 watts
Total maximum output 480 watts


Cooler Master GX450W 80PLUS PSU

+3.3v = 24A
+5.0v = 15A
+12v = 35A (420 watts)
+3.3v & +5v & +12v = 450 watts sustained output


In this case, the Cooler Master PSU (which appears to be less powerful at 450 watts) has more than double the 12-volt output.

The 12-volt output is what powers the CPU, motherboard and video cards. Some video card specs will list the amps (in addition to watts) required for a card to perform properly.

As Digerati said, always buy a PSU that has a little more wattage than what you think you'll initially need. Just be sure it's the 12-volt wattage required to run the big stuff in your PC.
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